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Waddington land still for sale

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WADDINGTON – The village board will have to decide next month whether to rebid or hire a realtor to sell its unsold surplus lands.

The village offered the sale of four waterfront lots totaling 1.5 acres located on the St. Lawrence River and Big Sucker Brook by sealed bid in August.

Adjacent landowners purchased .24 acres of property on James Street and .46 acres on St. Lawrence Avenue, but .46 acres and .57 acres located on St. Lawrence Avenue and Linden Street were not purchased.

The properties were offered to the highest bidder.

Richard J. Sovie, 44 St. Lawrence Ave, purchased one .46 acre parcel, but declined to purchase the neighboring parcel.

The properties are valued at approximately $52,000 for .46 acres and $65,000 for .57 acres.

“The village will have deicide at its next meeting what to do – whether it wants to put it back out for bid or hire a real estate firm,” Mayor Janet M. Otto-Cassada said.

The properties are part of seven parcels equaling 5.02 acres sold to the village in 2007 as surplus state lands in the 2003 relicensing agreement with the New York Power Authority.

Five of seven parcels have been appraised at a total of $317,000, but only three were offered for sale. One of the three parcels totaling .93 acres along St. Lawrence Avenue was divided into two.46-acre parcels following a land survey, and sold separately.

“We’re taking it slow, we don’t want to do too much at once,” Mrs. Otto-Cassada said about appraising and selling the other lots.

The village faces an obstacle in selling the land. Many of the properties are located on a 100-year flood plain, effective in 1979, according to the report filed by the appraisers. The flood plain designation may complicate a buyer’s bank financing prospects.

But Mrs. Otto-Cassada says she doesn’t forsee any problems with selling the property.

“They’re beautiful waterfront properties,” she said. “I don’t think we’ll have a problem selling them. I see them being used for residential purposes.”

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